Special Educational Needs and Disabilities

The 新月直播 is committed to a policy of inclusion: one in which the teaching, learning, achievements, attitudes and well-being of all our students matter – including those identified as having special educational needs and disabilities. Our staff, parents / carers and all stakeholders are working together towards common goals in ensuring equal opportunities for all students including students with special educational needs and disabilities. The culture, practice, management and deployment of the academy鈥檚 resources are designed to ensure all students鈥 needs are met.

At The 新月直播, the SEND Code of Practice (2014), Children and Families Act (2014) and Equality Act (2010) informs of practice for students with special educational needs and disabilities.

Nicola Catlow – SENDCo

To view our SEND, Accessibility and Equality Policies, please visit our聽Policies听辫补驳别.

View our SEND Information report

Key websites for support and information

  • Members of The 新月直播鈥檚聽 Inclusion Team are more than happy to support parents and carers in navigating these webpages and the services outlined should assistance be required

Questions about your child鈥檚 progress

Parents can contact SENCo or College teams directly either by the emails detailed above or by telephone 01322 620420.听

  • Additionally, Information Advice and Support Kent (IASK) provides a free and confidential, information, advice and support service for parents of a child with special educational need or disability as well as for young people up to the age of 25 who have a special educational need or disability. IASKs trained staff can provide impartially and legally based information and support on educational matters relating to special educational needs and disabilities, including health and social care. The aim is to empower parents and carers, children and young people to fully participate in discussions and make informed choices and decisions. Also to feel confident to express their views and wishes about education and future aspirations. Further information can be found on

Quality First Teaching strategies are utilised by all teaching staff within the academy. In addition, the academy is able to deploy learning support assistants to support students where necessary, as well as facilitating a range of interventions both internally and from across the wider Trust network to support聽 deaf awareness, speech, language and communication needs, selective autism, dyslexia, ADHD, ASD, Tourette’s syndrome, and physical disabilities.

The SEND Team regularly communicates the needs of the academy鈥檚 most vulnerable students via internal systems and leads on the training and development of teaching and support staff on a regular basis. The academy operates an open door policy so staff are always able to speak about a student and access the LIFT and STLS services from the local authority.

Should parents or carers wish to discuss their child鈥檚 special educational needs or have any concerns about any issues regarding the academy鈥檚 response to meeting these needs they are encouraged to contact the following academy staff (in order of escalation):聽

  • their child’s class/subject teacher
  • their child’s Form Tutor
  • the academy’s SENDCo
  • their child’s Assistant Head of College
  • their child’s Head of College
  • the academy’s Deputy Principal
  • the academy’s Principal

Parents are encouraged to attend the SEN coffee mornings that take place during module 1 of each academic year. These offer an excellent opportunity to meet key staff within the Inclusion team.

The academy has an internal register of all children with SEN this includes students with an Educational Health Care Plan and students with SEN support.

The effectiveness of SEND support/interventions are monitored on a modular basis by the SENDCo and the SEND team. When expected progress is made and students are achieving in line with their ability, a decision is made as to whether they continue to be identified as having special educational needs and remain on the school鈥檚 SEND Register. Parents / carers, staff and the student are involved in this review process.

We recognise the importance of early identification of SEND and aim to identify students鈥 needs as early as possible. The skills and levels of attainment of all students are assessed on entry, building on information from their previous educational setting. The purpose of identification is to work out what action the academy may need to take. As part of this process the needs of the whole child are considered, not just the special educational needs of the child / young person. The academy also works with parents and carers on this process to create student support plans which are reviewed each year and incorporates the views of staff, the child and parents and carers.

The academy uses Provision Map to distribute information including the students’ support plan. These are regularly updated and reviewed and then shared with teaching staff.

The 新月直播 has two specialist resource provisions: Hearing Impaired (HI) and Speech and Language (SLCN).听聽

  • The SLCN SRP is led by our specialist teacher of Speech and Language, Faye Moore. The academy also has a Speech and Language Therapist who works with students on a weekly basis each Monday.听聽The provision accommodates 11聽EHCP children.
  • Additionally, the inclusion team consists of 10 Learning Support Assistants (LSA鈥檚). A number of our LSA鈥檚 have been trained in specific areas to support our students including: 3 ELSAs, 1 visually impaired trained LSA, 2 hearing impaired trained, 1 ASD trained LSA and 1 reading intervention trained LSA including dyslexia.
  • The HI SRP is led by our teacher of the Deaf, Kathryn Matthews and currently has 5 EHCP students.
  • Additionally, the inclusion team consists of x Lead Learning Support Assistants (LSA鈥檚) 6 LSA (including x specialist HI)

LSA support students within lessons as well as offering support in the form of interventions which include:

  • ELSA (Emotional Literacy)
  • Literacy interventions: Nessy and Reciprocal Reading
  • Access to and support in the Inclusion Hub

The Specialist Resource Provision supports pupils with an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP) or SEN who require highly specialist provision students with a Hearing Impairment. To access the Specialist Resource Provision (SRP) your child must have an existing EHCP plan with a Hearing Impairment of Severe to Profound hearing loss and entry should be consulted through the Local Authority as part of the Annual Review Process or Statutory assessment.听

The Specialist Resource Provision is a specialist unit providing support for profoundly deaf children from Kent. Children with a hearing impairment benefit from the expertise of the highly qualified and experienced teacher staffing the SRP (Specialist Resource Provision).听 We also have BSL qualified Learning Support Assistants who are聽 skilled in signing and provide excellent levels of support.听 This ensures that the children who attend the SRP are as fully included in school life as much as possible.听 We greatly value the contribution to school life that the SRP brings.

Hearing Impaired students that have HI as their primary area of need but also have Speech and Language needs also have access to a HI specialist Speech and Language Therapist who works alongside the team.

Entry Arrangements

Children who are subject to an Education, Health and Care Plan assessment may be identified as suitable for the provision. In this case the relevant Kent SEN officer will send the child鈥檚 paperwork for consideration by the academy. Children with an existing Education Health and Care Plan may be identified as appropriate for a place in the SRP through their Annual Review. In this case the school should make the relevant Kent SEN officer aware of the request for a change in provision/placement and if appropriate he/she will send the child鈥檚 paperwork for consideration by the academy. The decision to offer the provision will be taken by the relevant Local Authority.

Exit Arrangements

Each student鈥檚 progress will be closely monitored and reviewed by the specialist staff in collaboration with mainstream school staff and parents/carers including the pupil as appropriate. Other professionals may be involved.

The EHCP In Year review and Annual Review meetings will consider the outcomes of support to determine whether the needs of the student continue to require this level of provision. If significant changes in the student鈥檚 profile occur, therapy input and alternative provision may be considered. Transition from the provision to a mainstream setting will be considered at the point where a child has made progress and no longer needs the provision.听

This could be where:

  1. Resultant or additional learning needs can be met within the mainstream setting (this could occur at any stage within their 5 or 7 year journey).听
  2. The child is at the end of Year 11 and transferring to further education.
  3. Alternative provision will also be considered where a child needs a higher level of specialist support or an alternative type of support because their presenting needs have changed. This will be monitored and discussed during in-year reviews and the Annual Review process. In the event of significant change of need, an early Annual Review can be called to schedule a change of provision.听

When a child is ready to leave the provision, effective transition will be planned and supported to enable success.

Key Stage 3:

Key Stage 3 students within the SRP will be offered a planned transition programme within the Summer term of Year 6 to promote and support a smooth transition to secondary school.听

Year 7, 8 and 9 students will all receive 1-1 sessions with the Teacher of the Deaf weekly, to meet individual needs identified within their EHCPs. The timing of SRP lessons will be decided on a case by case basis, dependent on individual need. Your child may also be offered specialist intervention delivered by trained Learning Support Assistants and offered in-class support where necessary.

Key Stage 4:

Students in Years 10 and 11 will follow a GCSE pathway, with some selecting additional vocational subjects. The timing of SRP specialist lessons will adjust to take account of the changing GCSE context with intervention lessons likely being offered during tutor time, core PE, or Healthy Mind lesson time. Disruption to GCSE learning time will be kept to a minimum with the focus of SRP lessons being on developing independence and study skills. One to one sessions with the Teacher of the Deaf will continue throughout Key Stage 4, as per recommendations in individual EHCPs.听

The Specialist Resourced Provision supports students with an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP) or SEN who require highly specialist provision for their speech, language and/or communication needs (SLCN). To access the Specialist Resource Provision (SRP) your child must have an existing EHCP plan with a diagnosis of Developmental Language Disorder (DLD) and entry should be consulted through the Local Authority as part of the Annual Review Process or Statutory assessment.听

Students will typically present with a profile of Developmental Language Disorder (DLD) as their primary area of need that requires specialist provision including direct speech and language therapy and specialist teaching support to be delivered within their mainstream school.

The language disorder may occur with or without a known associated condition e.g. Autism Spectrum Disorder or Hearing Impairment. It will be evident that language impairment is the main or primary barrier to learning.

There will be sufficient evidence on entry that the student鈥檚 language and /or speech needs require this level of specialist provision.

Entry Arrangements

Children who are subject to an Education, Health and Care Plan assessment may be identified as suitable for the provision. In this case the relevant Kent SEN officer will send the child鈥檚 paperwork for consideration by the academy.

Children with an existing Education Health and Care Plan may be identified as appropriate for a place in the SRP through their Annual Review. In this case the academy should make the relevant Kent SEN officer aware of the request for a change in provision/placement and if appropriate he/she will send the child鈥檚 paperwork for consideration by the academy. The decision to offer the provision will be taken by the relevant Local Authority.

Exit Arrangements

Each student鈥檚 progress will be closely monitored and reviewed by the specialist staff in collaboration with mainstream staff and parents/carers including the student as appropriate. Other professionals may be involved.

The EHCP In Year review and Annual Review meetings will regularly consider the outcomes of support to determine whether the needs of the student continue to require this level of provision. If significant changes in the student鈥檚 profile occur, therapy input and alternative provision may be considered. Transition from the provision to mainstream setting will be considered at the point where a child has made progress and no longer needs the provision.听

This could be where:

  1. Resultant or additional learning needs can be met within the mainstream setting (this could occur at any stage within their 5 or 7 year journey).听
  2. The child is at the end of Year 11 and transferring to further education.
  3. Alternative provision will also be considered where a child needs a higher level of specialist support or an alternative type of support because their presenting needs have changed. This will be monitored and discussed during in-year reviews and the Annual Review process. In the event of significant change of need, an early Annual Review can be called to schedule a change of provision.听

When a child is ready to leave the provision, effective transition will be planned and supported to enable success.

Key Stage 3:

Key Stage 3 students within the SRP will be offered a planned transition programme within the Summer term of Year 6 to promote and support a smooth transition to secondary school.听

Year 7, 8 and 9 students will all receive direct specialist Speech and Language Therapy, delivered in blocks to meet individual needs identified within their EHCPs. Students will also be offered specialist support from a SLCN lead teacher to support their speech and language needs. The timing of the Specialist Resourced Provision聽 lessons will be decided on a case by case basis, dependent on individual need. Your child may also be offered specialist intervention delivered by trained Learning Support Assistants and offered in-class support where necessary.

Key Stage 4:

Students in Years 10 and 11 will follow a GCSE pathway, with some selecting additional vocational subjects. The timing of the SRP will adjust to take account of the changing GCSE context with intervention lessons likely being offered during tutor time, core PE, or Healthy Mind lesson time. Disruption to GCSE learning time will be kept to a minimum with the focus of the Specialist Resource Provision lessons being on developing independence and study skills. Direct Speech and Language Therapy will continue throughout Key Stage 4, as per recommendations in individual EHCPs.听

Initially please speak to your child’s class teacher. If you would like to speak to our SEND department, please contact via our contact details which can be found in the ‘worried about a child’ section above.

We can only screen for dyslexia, and this will provide an overview of your child’s strengths and areas for development. Screening reports are then shared with teachers so they are aware of how to support your child through Quality First Teaching in the classroom.

This depends on the referral – please speak to the pastoral team for further information regarding your child’s referral.

Yes the school can refer your child for a diagnosis of ADHD, ASD or other referrals needed such as Speech and language. These referrals are completed by the SENCO with support of the pastoral team/teachers. You may prefer to discuss this with your GP as they can facilitate a referral too.

This will be dependent on the level of SEND that your child presents with and support needed at home and at school. The process will require your child to have a personalised plan, if appropriate, that is reviewed at least 3 times and with some specialist involvement. They might be in receipt of Higher Needs Funding – which you would have been informed about via the SENDCo. If you would like to discuss this further please contact the SEND department.

As a school we have a Wellbeing service that can support students with a variety of emotional difficulties. Please speak to your child’s class teacher or pastoral team for further information.

Higher Needs Funding (HNF) levels are dependent on need. The money school receives can be used in a variety of ways to support their needs.

The British Dyslexia Association says:

Dyslexia is a neurological difference and can have a significant impact during education, in the workplace and in everyday life. As each person is unique, so is everyone’s experience of dyslexia. It can range from mild to severe, and it can co-occur with other learning differences. It usually runs in families and is a life-long condition. It is a specific learning difficulty.

We are bound by the Kent (local authority) definition for Dyslexia which can be found in their policy at:
https://www.kent.gov.uk/education-and-children/special-educational-needs/send-strategy/dyslexia-policy

Therefore, if your child has a significant weakness in single word spelling and/or reading (and has had good educational opportunities, teaching and interventions) then they may meet the Kent criteria for dyslexia.

For us to gain a better understanding of your child鈥檚 literacy skills (this is where weaknesses are most evident) we can run a 鈥榮trengths and weaknesses鈥 screener. This identifies a possible dyslexic profile or dyslexic tendencies. It helps us identify weaker 鈥榗ognitive鈥 skills such a phonological processing (being able to identify and manipulate the sounds in words) which can signify dyslexic tendencies.

We would then want to gather information from you and the class teacher, and look at a child鈥檚 work. A screener is a limited snapshot of a child鈥檚 ability 鈥 it is important we gather a full picture and look at interventions over time too.

Therefore, we can screen your child for a possible dyslexic profile and to help us identify possible interventions, but this is not the same as a dyslexia diagnosis. We cannot diagnose dyslexia in our school. This would need to be an independent certified assessor. It is an educational diagnosis that is life-long and results from high levels of psychometric testing that staff in primary schools are not qualified to use. A diagnosis is recognised under the Disability Discrimination Act (2010), permits an older child to have access arrangements at secondary school and adaptations in the workplace. This is private and comes at a cost. Assessors look for a discrepancy between a child鈥檚 general ability (like their IQ) and a child鈥檚 literacy skills.

Our teachers have dyslexia awareness training and can make adaptations to their teaching so that your child can access the curriculum like their peers. Very often, good strategies for dyslexic children are good for all children. Our focus is always on good teaching and good interventions, rather than the label.

Autism is a neurodevelopmental condition. Therefore, any diagnosis of autism is a life-long health diagnosis and is not educational. There is no 鈥榯est鈥 for autism. Instead, a paediatrician will collate evidence about a child鈥檚 social communication skills, repetitive or restrictive interests and sensory differences so that a judgement against particular Health criteria can be made.

Why does the parent think this? What behaviour do they see at home? Does the class teacher see the same traits?

This is a school-based referral, where the school agrees that there are social/play/sensory differences that should be explored. Perhaps interventions have taken place to help the child with their social skills.

Once a referral by school is sent to the local Community Paediatrics team, parents can expect to wait 2-3 years before being notified about a paediatric appointment. ASD is not diagnosed at this appointment. Instead the paediatrician will observe the child and discuss the information given already with parents, before making a judgement about whether the child should move onto the ASD pathway.

The pathway lasts up to 3 years. In this time, the paediatrician will collect more evidence from parents and school. The child is invited to a longer 鈥榡oint communication clinic鈥 where a highly specialised speech and language therapist and a paediatrician work together to make a diagnosis, or not.

Once a child is on the pathway, the school will be advised to implement ASD strategies if they are not doing so already.

As above, this is a Health diagnosis. This is a behavioural disorder.
Same principles apply 鈥 school based referral to a Community Paediatrician. We need to see inattentive or hyperactive/ impulsive behaviour that is significantly different from the majority of the peer group and across different environments, to refer. Children cannot be referred until they are 6.
No test for ADHD. Instead information is collated from home/school and a certain 鈥榯hreshold鈥 must be met when comparing parent and school scores – and the child is observed in clinic. A Connors questionnaire is common.
Medication is a possibility depending on the severity of the ADHD and parent views.
Some children have a diagnoses of 鈥楢DHD鈥搃nattentive type鈥, which is the old ADD (no hyperactivity).

Dyscalculia is a specific maths difficulty. It is inherent rather than just being 鈥榳eaker鈥 at maths. A child will display intrinsic difficulties with their quantitative understanding of number at a basic level 鈥 i.e. show them 3 counters, then 6, and they could not quantify that one set was larger than the other, nor could they give sensible estimates for each quantity.

This would be a child with very poor conversion of number. We have very few children where this has been identified. We cannot diagnose dyscalculia. This would fall to an Educational Psychologist or a certified assessor, and would likely be a private educational diagnosis.

Dyscalculia is specific 鈥 so a child is likely to be average in many aspects of schooling, apart from maths. It probably could not be considered if a child has general learning difficulties, a bit like dyslexia.

The important thing is to understand a child鈥檚 mathematical gaps and work with them through intervention and class-based support.

This is also called Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD).
This affects a child鈥檚 gross and fine motor skill development and sometimes their sensory profile.
It can arise with other specific conditions 鈥 dyslexia, ASD, ADHD etc.

Does the teacher see functional difficulties with a child鈥檚 self-care skills? E.g. changing for PE, gross motor coordination in PE, fine motor skills 鈥 scissor and pen skills, knife and fork skills, handwriting? Does the child appear clumsy and less able to coordinate their movements than peers? Struggles to throw and catch in PE? We need to evidence 3 different functional areas that the child struggles with.

If we see the above, then the child probably has had/needs intervention anyway.

A DCD diagnosis is a Health diagnosis and requires a referral to an Occupational Therapist. The OT service needs to see that the school have put in appropriate interventions such as BEAM or Clever Fingers for up to 50 sessions, before a referral can be made. Therefore gathering what is needed for an OT referral can take some time.

Once the referral is made, the wait can be 3-4 months before parent and child is invited to clinic (if the referral criteria is met). The OT can then identify strengths and weaknesses and help parents and school develop a programme or strategies that will help the child compensate for their motor weaknesses.

Some children experience a speech or language delay – the difficulty is likely to resolve itself or 鈥榗atch up鈥 or could be a disorder, which is where more specialist intervention may be needed.

We know that children with speech and language difficulties may go on to have difficulties with learning, particularly literacy, though this is not always the case.

Very few of our children need 1:1 support to make good progress.

The vast majority of children learn when teaching is responsive to their needs and work is well differentiated. Class TAs are used to help scaffold children鈥檚 learning if they find things more tricky.

Sometimes, 1:1 support can also lead to dependency on an adult (I can only learn when an adult sits next to me) and we all want your child to be an independent learner.

In some situations, we may need to apply for funding to provide a child with some key person/1:1 support. This is called High Needs Funding, and is for children that require bespoke approaches. Applications for this high level of support are stringent and require lots of plan/do/review, evidence and proof of what is spent already on a child鈥檚 support.

Please note that an EHCP does not 鈥榗ome with鈥 funding attached or a certain number of hours of 1:1 TA support. This happened in the old system of 鈥榮tatements of SEN鈥, but is not the case now.

Parent guidance for HNF available on the Kelsi website.

This is an Educational Healthcare Plan. This used to be called a Statement of SEN.听聽About 1% of children in mainstream schools have an EHCP. Most children with an EHCP require specialist provision (special school) and an EHCP allows a parent this choice.

An EHCP is a legal document owned by the Local Authority. It sets out a child鈥檚 needs, the provision needed to meet those needs, and the school placement.听 The criteria for an EHCP is stringent.

A parent can apply for an EHCP for their child by emailing the dept at SENWest@kent.gov.uk

It is so important the parent knows the school鈥檚 view, because school provides a significant proportion of the evidence to the Local Authority. School and parent should be in agreement that specialist approaches are needed to enable the child to make progress. It is not about lots of diagnoses necessarily although any diagnosis is supportive.

KELSI contains documentation about the 鈥榩athway鈥 and timelines, but the whole process, from request to 鈥榙ecision to issue鈥 the plan is 20 weeks. Sometimes, if there is a lack of evidence, the process stops at 6 weeks.听聽If a parent is unhappy about a decision, they can appeal to the Local Authority.

A school can also make a request for an EHCP but need to be sure that they have sufficient plan/do/review (3 rounds of provision plans) and evidence of what has been in place (high levels of provision) not working. Schools also need to take an EHCP request to their local LIFT meeting so that specialists can determine if anything more can be done, before an EHCP is requested.听 That is why a parent request, supported by the school, can be quicker.

It is worth noting that quite a few outside agencies are giving the wrong message to parents about EHCPs. E.g. your child has an ASD diagnosis 鈥 have you considered an EHCP? This advice is often given without recourse to the severity of need that an EHCP justifies.

We would encourage you to read the Inclusion policy on our website.
The school is bound by a definition of Special Educational Needs as set out by the legal framework, the SEN Code of Practice (2014).

A child or young person has SEN if they have a learning difficulty or disability which calls for special educational provision to be made for him or her.
A child of compulsory school age or a young person has a learning difficulty or disability if he or she:
has a significantly greater difficulty in learning than the majority of others of the same age, or
has a disability which prevents or hinders him or her from making use of facilities of a kind generally provided for others of the same age in mainstream schools or mainstream post-16 institutions
For children aged two or more, special educational provision is educational or training provision that is additional to or different from that made generally for other children or young people of the same age

Being SEN or being placed on a school鈥檚 SEN register is not because a child receives a diagnosis of a condition 鈥 it must be because educational provision is consistently different for them to enable them to make progress in their areas of difficulty. Parents must remember that if their child has a Health condition or diagnosis, that this probably falls under the 2010 Equality Act and means that any school or educational provider must make reasonable adjustments for them, whether they are SEN or not.

We support children as their needs arise and teachers adapt work and their teaching delivery as necessary, maintaining interventions for those children that need something additional. Being SEN or not SEN does not change this.

If your child moves onto the SEN register they will be classed as 鈥楽EN support鈥 and their teacher will identify long term Outcomes for them to work towards.